Diversity in National Parks Resources

We have done quite a bit of research over the years and started to compile this database of resources for diversity in the national parks.

This collection of academic studies, books, interviews, and blog posts contain all the statistics we used in Our Initiative page and some more information for further education on diversifying our parks.

This database is always growing, so visit often to view new resources. Please share this and reach out if you have any suggestions or would like to be featured!

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History - How the national parks were created

We all love the beautiful landscapes and iconic scenery of the national parks, but we rarely discuss the formation of the national parks and the hand-in-hand creation of the reservation system.

If you are a true national park fan, you must understand the genocide that accompanies the idea of "preservation of wilderness" romanticized by Westerners.

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Ethnic Cleansing And America's Creation Of National Parks

Native American rights in national parks present a dilemma. These lands were wrongfully taken, and recognition of rights owing to treaties and the existence of significant cultural and religious sites or traditional use is the most equitable recourse.

Yet the continent has changed greatly since those nineteenth century treaties. The ecosystems found in the parks are fragmented or non-existent beyond their borders.

The parks are the best -sometimes only - habitat available for many species.

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Dispossessing the Wilderness: Indian Removal and the Making of the National Parks

National parks like Yellowstone, Yosemite, and Glacier preserve some of this country's most cherished wilderness landscapes. While visions of pristine, uninhabited nature led to the creation of these parks, they also inspired policies of Indian removal.

By contrasting the native histories of these places with the links between Indian policy developments and preservationist efforts, this work examines the complex origins of the national parks and the troubling consequences of the American wilderness ideal.

The first study to place national park history within the context of the early reservation era, it details the ways that national parks developed into one of the most important arenas of contention between native peoples and non-Indians in the twentieth century.

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National Parks Are Beautiful—But The Way They Were Created Isn’t

On August 25, 1916, 100 years ago, President Woodrow Wilson created the National Park Service by establishing a new bureau in the Department of the Interior. Know what other bureau has always sat right alongside it?

The Bureau of Indian Affairs. This is no small coincidence. The two departments were not only closely situated, they were closely related in a “dual island system” of nature preserves and Indian reservations.

We tend today to think of our national parks as sprawling natural treasures, gifted to our country by the government, starting with Congress’ Yellowstone Act of 1872, spurred on by the interests and legacy of Theodore Roosevelt.

The Yellowstone Act began a global national park movement, for which we are very grateful today, as scores of travelers enjoy the majestic wilderness and natural preserves they protect.

READ ARTICLE

From Yosemite To Bears Ears, Erasing Native Americans From U.S. National Parks

Immersed in the American West during the early 19th century, artist George Catlin made it his goal to capture idyllic scenes of nature, often featuring the frontier’s many Native American inhabitants.

Catlin was concerned about the destruction white settlers would bring as they moved west from the urbanized East Coast, reshaping the landscape for agricultural and industrial uses, and he wanted to document scenes of indigenous life before it was forever altered.

His artwork captures vibrant green vistas filled with Native Americans playing games, dancing, and performing religious rituals, or hunters chasing buffalo and taming wild horses.

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20 And Odd: Exploring 400 Years Of The African American Experience

Set against 400 years of suffering, healing, and strength, with a backdrop of our nation’s most storied lands, the innumerable contributions of African Americans to the foundation of the United States are recognized in this short film.

“Twenty & Odd” serves as a visual tool to inform and highlight and to educate the nation as a whole about the trauma, resilience, and beauty of the African American experience in our country through the lens of sites stewarded by the National Park Service.

This film provides an opportunity to motivate and empower people from all walks of life to adopt and maintain healthy lifestyle behaviors, cultivate personal connections with national parks, and embrace parks as welcoming sources of health and healing.

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How African American Soldiers Shaped The First National Parks

“We arrived as indigenous Africans comfortable in the outdoors,” Johnson says. “But when you’ve been enslaved for many generations and trapped and beaten or worse for having the temerity to escape… then that environment will forever be stained by what happened. [That fear] is in our genes.”

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Interpreting The Contributions Of Chinese Immigrants In Yosemite National Park's History

Immersed in the American West during the early 19th century, artist George Catlin made it his goal to capture idyllic scenes of nature, often featuring the frontier’s many Native American inhabitants. Catlin was concerned about the destruction white settlers would bring as they moved west from the urbanized East Coast, reshaping the landscape for agricultural and industrial uses, and he wanted to document scenes of indigenous life before it was forever altered.

His artwork captures vibrant green vistas filled with Native Americans playing games, dancing, and performing religious rituals, or hunters chasing buffalo and taming wild horses.

READ STUDY HERE

Extend The Experience: Asians And Pacific Islanders In The Civil War

Asians and Pacific Islanders fought for both the Union and the Confederacy during the Civil War. Understanding their experiences and perspectives is essential to understanding the full scope of a conflict that defined the country, and changed the world, for decades to come.

From the Chinese laborers forced into indentured servitude fighting for freedom in the west, to the forgotten warriors in the war’s epic battles in the east, the voices of Asians and Pacific Islanders during this tumultuous time provide a full picture of America during the Civil War.

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How A Chinese Cook Helped Establish Yosemite And The National Park Service

“Hundreds of Chinese go to Yosemite. ... Imagine what the experience would be for them if they knew that Chinese worked on these roads over a hundred years ago.”

For one breakfast in the Sierra Nevada Mountains during the summer of 1915, there was “fresh fruit, cereal, steak, potatoes, hot cakes and maple syrup, sausage, eggs, hot rolls and coffee,” Horace Albright, a member of the party, wrote in his book detailing the expedition. And for one dinner, there was “soup, trout, chops, fried potatoes, string beans, fresh bread, hot apple pie, cheese and coffee,” according to the writer Robert Sterling Yard.

The meals were prepared by Tie Sing, a backcountry cook working for the United States Geological Survey. In 1915, Stephen Mather, a special assistant to the secretary of the interior, hired Sing to cook for a two-week wilderness expedition intended to convince business and cultural leaders of the importance of a national park system.

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These 10 National Parks Wouldn’t Exist Without Women

Women were the driving force behind the creation of many of our most popular national parks, yet few today are household names. Time to give credit where credit is due.

From Joshua Tree to Great Sand Dunes, these national park sites simply wouldn’t exist as we know them today without the tireless efforts of dedicated women.

Learn about the unsung heroes who made it happen.

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Series: LGBTQ America: A Theme Study Of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, And Queer History

The LGBTQ Theme Study is a publication of the National Park Foundation for the National Park Service and funded by the Gill Foundation. Each chapter is written and peer-reviewed by experts in LGBTQ Studies.

SEE SERIES HERE

statistics and Studies - the numbers don't lie

Women were the driving force behind the creation of many of our most popular national parks, yet few today are household names. Time to give credit where credit is due.

From Joshua Tree to Great Sand Dunes, these national park sites simply wouldn’t exist as we know them today without the tireless efforts of dedicated women.

Learn about the unsung heroes who made it happen.

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People of Color and
Their Constraints to National Parks Visitation

The United States population is becoming more ethnically and racially diverse than in the past.

More than one-third of all Americans can be classified as a person of color (Black, Hispanic, Asian, or Native American), and the proportion of ethnic and racial minorities is projected to increase in the future (US Census Bureau 2012).

Hispanics are now the largest minority group in the United States, followed by African Americans, Asian Americans, and Native Americans.

Demographers predict that the White population will become a numerical minority by 2050 (Colby and Ortman 2015). 

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urban settings create stress - Nature cures it - stanford university

A new study finds quantifiable evidence that walking in nature could lead to a lower risk of depression.

Specifically, the study, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, found that people who walked for 90 minutes in a natural area, as opposed to participants who walked in a high-traffic urban setting, showed decreased activity in a region of the brain associated with a key factor in depression.

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Why America’s national parks are so white - al jazeera

“Why are our parks so white?” columnist Glenn Nelson asked in a recent op-ed in The New York Times.

Nelson, who runs Trail Posse, an online platform that promotes diversity in the outdoors, explains that people of color are only about half as likely to visit national parks as whites.

He offers two reasons for this disparity: People of color are less familiar with parks and therefore hesitant to go, and there is a lack of racial diversity among the nation’s park employees.

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National park service comprehensive survey of the American public, 2008-2009; national technical report

In 2008 and 2009 the National Park Service (NPS) conducted its second Comprehensive Survey of the American Public (CSAP2), a nationwide telephone survey consisting of 15-minute interviews with more than 4,000 respondents across the United States.

Several questions contained in the first NPS comprehensive survey conducted in 2000 (CSAP1) were replicated in this second iteration.

Both surveys obtained information on public attitudes and behaviors related to programs and services provided by the NPS, as well as on demographic characteristics of recent visitors and non-visitors to the National Park System.

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Why Do So Few Minority People Visit National Parks? Visitation and the Accessibility of “America's Best Idea”

It has been said that national parks are “America's Best Idea,” they are among the most famous and instantly recognizable places in the country, and they attract visitors from all over the world.

Yet visitors to these sites are overwhelmingly white. A number of theoretical perspectives have been proposed for the absence of minority visitors, including socioeconomic marginality, differing cultural norms, and the lingering legacy of discrimination, but geography is not one of the usual explanations.

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Racial Discrimination and African Americans' Travel Behavior: The Utility of Habitus and Vignette Technique

This study investigated African Americans’ travel behavior using Bourdieu’s concept of habitus. In-depth and face-to-face interviews were conducted with 13 middle class African Americans.

Vignette technique was used during the interviews. The study identified four salient themes: (1) racial discrimination during traveling, (2) storytelling and safety instructions, (3) fear of racism and its reproduction, and (4) race-related travel choices. The findings showed that informants’ strong fear of discrimination is manifested in their distinctive travel behavior.

They affirmed that African Americans’ travel patterns need to be conceived as a defensive mechanism against potential racial discrimination. Implications for research methods and tourism management are discussed.

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Why are there so few ethnic minorities in ecology and evolutionary biology? Challenges to inclusion and the role of sense of belonging

African Americans and other ethnic minorities are severely underrepresented in both graduate education and among the professoriate in ecology and evolutionary biology (EEB).

In the present research, we take a social psychological approach to studying inclusion by examining interrelationships among challenges to inclusion, the sense of belonging, and interest in pursuing graduate education in EEB.

We conducted a survey of African American (N = 360), Latino/a/Hispanic (N = 313), White (N = 709), and Asian/Asian American (N = 524) college undergraduates majoring in science, technology, engineering, and math fields and used the results to test several interrelated hypotheses derived from our theoretical model.

Compared to Whites, ethnic minorities were more likely to experience challenges to inclusion in EEB (e.g., less exposure to ecology, fewer same-race role models, discomfort in outdoor environments).

Challenges to inclusion were associated with a decreased sense of belonging in EEB educational contexts. Finally, experiencing a low sense of belonging in EEB educational contexts was associated with lower interest in pursuing graduate education in EEB.

Sense of belonging in EEB was especially low among African Americans relative to Whites. We discuss the implications of the study results for educational interventions.

REQUEST STUDY HERE

books inspiring change

Here is a list of books we've compiled that push diversity in the national parks or outdoors in general. Please let us know if we need to add any!

See the full list by clicking the button below!

SEE FULL LIST HERE

Sign my name to freedom: a memoir of a pioneering life by betty reid soskin

In Betty Reid Soskin’s 96 years of living, she has been a witness to a grand sweep of American history.

When she was born in 1921, the lynching of African-Americans was a national disgrace, minstrel shows were the most popular American form of entertainment, women were looked at suspiciously by many for exercising their right to vote, and most African-Americans in the Deep South could not vote at all.

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gloryland by shelton johnson

Born on Emancipation Day, 1863, to a sharecropping family of black and Indian blood, Elijah Yancy never lived as a slave—but his self–image as a free person is at war with his surroundings: Spartanburg, South Carolina, in the Reconstructed South.

Exiled for his own survival as a teenager, Elijah walks west to the Nebraska plains—and, like other rootless young African–American men of that era, joins up with the US cavalry.

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Black Faces, White Spaces: Reimagining the Relationship of African Americans to the Great Outdoors

Why are African Americans so underrepresented when it comes to interest in nature, outdoor recreation, and environmentalism?

In this thought-provoking study, Carolyn Finney looks beyond the discourse of the environmental justice movement to examine how the natural environment has been understood, commodified, and represented by both white and black Americans.

Bridging the fields of environmental history, cultural studies, critical race studies, and geography, Finney argues that the legacies of slavery, Jim Crow, and racial violence have shaped cultural understandings of the "great outdoors" and determined who should and can have access to natural spaces.

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The current experiences in the parks

Here is a list of books we've compiled that push diversity in the national parks or outdoors in general.

Please let us know if we need to add any!

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Many National Parks Get The Indian Story Wrong

National parks are America's great outdoor classrooms, and they attract about 300 million visitors a year, from school groups to senior citizens, mountain climbers to families in minivans.

The vast majority of those people will flip through the park's brochure, browse exhibits at in the visitor center, and read some of the informational signs posted at the roadside turnouts.

READ ARTICLE

How the national parks are failing women

In 2000, an employee survey found that over half of female rangers and three-quarters of female park police had experienced sexual ­harassment on the job.

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Bad things happen in the woods: the anxiety of hiking while black

In this article by the Guardian, three African American hikers describe fears and stereotypes they have faced – and why they love hitting the trails

READ ARTICLE

What The Outdoor Rec Industry Doesn’t Get About The LGBTQ Community

“Nature doesn’t care if you’re gay,” I’ll often hear in reaction to articles by myself or my outdoorsy LGBTQ peers. And it’s true. Nature doesn’t care if I’m gay.

But people do.

Two months ago, I finished a world-record journey to all 419 National Park Service sites. For three years nonstop, I lived in a van, hiked trails everywhere from American Samoa to the Arctic Circle, and accomplished an outdoors journey no human had ever done before.

But comments about the trip have included things like, “Well now I need to be careful in the bathroom at national parks,” and “Why do you have to shove your lifestyle down our throats!”

And a sponsor terminated our partnership halfway through the project, saying over the phone and in writing that I was doing too much LGBTQ outreach.

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Interpreting The Asian-American Experience In Parks

The history of Asians in the U.S. reaches back to the early 1800s, long before the American Civil War.

Asian peoples have made substantial contributions to the development of the U.S. throughout our history.

From the Filipinos who were settling in the New Orleans area since at least the 1800s; to the Asian-Americans who served in the U.S. armed forces since the War of 1812; to the Chinese who comprised most of the labor force for the Central Pacific Railroad’s portion of the first Transcontinental Railroad in the 1860s – Asians played a large role in shaping the story of this country.

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We're Here. You Just Don't See Us.

There’s a common misconception that black people don’t love wild places. Latria Graham, a southerner with deep connections to farms, rivers, and forests, says the problem isn’t desire but access—and a long history of laws and customs that have whitewashed our finest public lands.

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The Black History Month Blog I DIDN’T Write

Given that I think the survival of the entire human race is in jeopardy under the current US administration, it’s hard for me to focus on the history and contributions made to this country by my black brothers and sisters and our forebears.

Dealing with the cascading assaults upon the pillars of our democracy including mad ravings about the press, judiciary and our populace coming from the highest office in the land, coupled with the health issues of an aging parent put my blog far down on my list.

As familiar as I am with the natural and historical landscape of America in national parks from Alaska to Florida, NOTHING prepared me to deal with the current maelstrom.

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Sacred Native American Sites Are Not Your Playgrounds

The Presidio is part of my tribe’s ancestral homeland – our territory extends from Vallejo all the way down to Big Sur and throughout the Salinas Valley.

But we’re a displaced tribe – meaning we no longer live together here, so I didn't grow up in the Presidio. I grew up in Southern California and went to Cal Poly Pomona University, where I studied Gender Ethnicity Multicultural Studies.

I moved to San Francisco and began living in the Presidio four years ago.

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success Stories of diversity in The parks

Here is a list of books we've compiled that push diversity in the national parks or outdoors in general. Please let us know if we need to add any!

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Xochitl Garibay Begins Park Ranger Job With Golden Gate National Recreation Area

Originally from the San Fernando Valley, Xochitl found her passion for spreading awareness of the natural world through her writing and reading.

She interned as an Interpretive Ranger in Yosemite.

Her interests in the environment, Native American folklore and Aztec mythology are the driving inspirations for her future endeavors, and were central to the senior thesis project she wrote as part of her English major in Fall 2018.

READ HER STORY

The Story Of Gerard Baker

A Mandan-Hidatsa Indian, Gerard Baker grew up on the Fort Berthold Reservation in North Dakota. His youth was spent breaking horses, running cows, and doing chores on his family's ranch.

At night, he and his family would listen to stories told by tribal elders—stories of warfare, great hunts, tricksters, and survival. From these stories, he learned about his people and about who he was and who he wanted to be.

READ HIS STORY

Q&A With NPS American Indian Services Specialist Otis Halfmoon

A national park is a place to reflect about one’s self. A place to consider the historical event that took place and/or to see America’s cultural and natural resources.

It is truly a place to save for generations not yet born. A national park is also an area to hear the untold stories of various nationalities. In this sense, to enrich an already rich story. They are truly the gems of America.

READ HIS STORY

National Park Service Ranger Desiree Munoz Talks About Her Ohlone Heritage

The Presidio is part of my tribe’s ancestral homeland – our territory extends from Vallejo all the way down to Big Sur and throughout the Salinas Valley.

But we’re a displaced tribe – meaning we no longer live together here, so I didn't grow up in the Presidio. I grew up in Southern California and went to Cal Poly Pomona University, where I studied Gender Ethnicity Multicultural Studies. I moved to San Francisco and began living in the Presidio four years ago.

READ HER STORY

Amazing Women In The Parks

Today we celebrate the women who, despite unequal opportunities and mistreatment in the national park system, persisted to make significant contributions to the preservation of our nation’s treasured natural, cultural, and historical areas.

May we learn from them, seek inspiration from them, and continue to share their stories and fight for equality even when it isn’t International Women’s Day.

It should come as no shock that women have not always been a welcomed presence in the historically male-dominated National Park Service. The first female park rangers (called “rangerettes”) were only temporary, filling in for men serving in World War I.

READ THEIR STORIES

Benn Pikyavit - Southern Paiute Tribal Member And Elder/Park Ranger

A national park is a place to reflect about one’s self. A place to consider the historical event that took place and/or to see America’s cultural and natural resources.

It is truly a place to save for generations not yet born. A national park is also an area to hear the untold stories of various nationalities. In this sense, to enrich an already rich story. They are truly the gems of America.

READ HIS STORY

Miguel Marquez - #NBCLatino20: The Park Ranger

On August 25, 1916, 100 years ago, President Woodrow Wilson created the National Park Service by establishing a new bureau in the Department of the Interior. Know what other bureau has always sat right alongside it? The Bureau of Indian Affairs.

This is no small coincidence. The two departments were not only closely situated, they were closely related in a “dual island system” of nature preserves and Indian reservations.

We tend today to think of our national parks as sprawling natural treasures, gifted to our country by the government, starting with Congress’ Yellowstone Act of 1872, spurred on by the interests and legacy of Theodore Roosevelt.

The Yellowstone Act began a global national park movement, for which we are very grateful today, as scores of travelers enjoy the majestic wilderness and natural preserves they protect.

READ HIS STORY

Cam Juarez - How One National Park Is Attracting Latino Visitors

Designated by Teddy Roosevelt in 1906, Arizona’s Montezuma Castle National Monument became one of the first national monuments, preserving cliff dwellings in North America and showcasing the Sinagua culture’s ingenious use of the desert landscape to prosper for generations.

Sixty years later, Georgia’s Ocmulgee National Monument was added to the National Park System to celebrate the many different Native American cultures that comprise over 17,000 years of history at the park.

These are just two of the many national parks across the country that interpret the history, culture, and contributions of Native Americans in the U.S.

READ HIS STORY

Pura Vida - Engaging Latino Youth In Grant Teton National Park

Historically, local Latino youth and their families have visited Grand Teton at much lower rates than other populations. Grand Teton National Foundation (GTNPF) has partnered with Grand Teton National Park (GTNP) and Teton Science Schools (TSS) to create Pura Vida, an outreach program that both educates and engages Latino youth in GTNP.

The hope is that the students will share their new-found interest in GTNP with their families when they return home, encouraging them to spend more time in the park. Pura Vida dissolves barriers between Jackson’s Latino community and GTNP by offering extensive outdoor learning experiences, leadership training, and wilderness recreation.

READ THEIR STORY

America’s National Parks Through the Eyes of a Gay Couple on an RV Journey to See Them All

As it turns out, national parks are the best medicine for homesickness. They’re also a source of comfort and inclusion, especially as a hiking-obsessed gay man hoofing it through red states.

America’s national parks have long been a source of inspiration and rejuvenation for my husband Brad and I, so when the opportunity presented itself to live in an RV and visit these beautiful places, I dove in head-first.

A daunting considering I prefer to tiptoe into things, rather than plunge all at once.

READ THEIR STORY

a buffalo soldier speaks - podcast by shelton johnson

Born on Emancipation Day, 1863, to a sharecropping family of black and Indian blood, Elijah Yancy never lived as a slave—but his self–image as a free person is at war with his surroundings: Spartanburg, South Carolina, in the Reconstructed South.

Exiled for his own survival as a teenager, Elijah walks west to the Nebraska plains—and, like other rootless young African–American men of that era, joins up with the US cavalry.

LISTEN NOW

He’s Gay, Christian And 75% Of The Way To Exploring All 417 National Parks

Mikah Meyer is a man on a mission.

The 32-year-old adventurer is attempting to set a world record by becoming the youngest person to visit all 417 U.S. national parks. On Sunday, when he camped out at Death Valley National Park in California, he visited his 313th site, putting him 75% of the way there.

If all goes according to plan, Meyer will reach his goal on April 29, 2019, by climbing the steps of the Lincoln Memorial. Alaska, with its difficult terrain and logistical challenges, will be his big push this summer.

READ HIS STORY

Grace Bourke - An Open Invitation To LGBTQ - Point Reyes National Seashore 

As a volunteer for Point Reyes National Seashore Associate, I was facilitating a photography weekend class at the park. It was Saturday night, and we were at the lighthouse. The lighthouse being lit at night was a special occasion. The size of the group was too large to all be in the lighthouse at one time.

So, we split the group up. Half the class would go down to the lighthouse to photograph inside while the other half would wait at the top of the stairs. After an hour or so, we would switch.

Somehow, I was the first facilitator at the top of the stairs. I like to think that I was gracious and volunteered (I’m not really sure that’s how it happened).

READ HER STORY

the future of the national parks

Born on Emancipation Day, 1863, to a sharecropping family of black and Indian blood, Elijah Yancy never lived as a slave—but his self–image as a free person is at war with his surroundings: Spartanburg, South Carolina, in the Reconstructed South.

Exiled for his own survival as a teenager, Elijah walks west to the Nebraska plains—and, like other rootless young African–American men of that era, joins up with the US cavalry.

READ MORE

African Americans Are Important To The Survival Of National Parks

The beauty of Yosemite’s trails and wilderness is what first drew hiking enthusiast Teresa Baker into frequenting more national parks.

Like the hundreds of other visitors to the parks, Baker’s attention was turned to the natural landscape, but when the young African American decided to engage in a little people-watching, she noticed something striking.

“On one of my Yosemite visits in 2012,” she tells High Country News, “I started to take notice of how many African Americans I encountered. At the end of my second day in the park, I had not seen one other African American.”

READ ARTICLE

Making National Parks Accessible To Native People Again

While boarding the plane, we get the text. Mom was in the hospital.

My mother is a downwinder. She spent her early childhood in Kingman, Arizona, where the fallout of U.S. nuclear tests rained. She has nonsmoker’s lung cancer, diabetes, and blood clots. Now dialysis has entered the picture. She and my father left rural New Mexico for Phoenix, Arizona, when she first got sick.

They figured big city doctors were better.

READ ARTICLE

Innovative Park Programs Help Tell Native American Stories To A New Generation

Designated by Teddy Roosevelt in 1906, Arizona’s Montezuma Castle National Monument became one of the first national monuments, preserving cliff dwellings in North America and showcasing the Sinagua culture’s ingenious use of the desert landscape to prosper for generations.

Sixty years later, Georgia’s Ocmulgee National Monument was added to the National Park System to celebrate the many different Native American cultures that comprise over 17,000 years of history at the park.

These are just two of the many national parks across the country that interpret the history, culture, and contributions of Native Americans in the U.S.

READ ARTICLE

Pushing For Greater Inclusion Of Asian American And Pacific Islander History Through The National Park Service

The National Park Service (NPS) system and programs belong to all Americans, and we are working hard to ensure that they reflect the rich diversity of our nation. Through our AAPI Heritage Initiative, we are recognizing the stories of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPIs) and their contributions to our country’s diverse history.

The goals of the initiative are to identify physical places that are historically significant and capture intangible history.

READ ARTICLE

Celebrating A Lasting Pride In Your Parks

Everyone loves a countdown. The crowds waiting for the final moment in Times Square on New Year’s Eve, hordes of hat-adorned visitors hoping for a glimpse of a royal wedding, your impatient stomach standing before the microwave’s timer as your pizza rolls cook, and a band called Europe in 1986.

June is Pride Month, and while Stonewall National Monument shares the unforgettable story of the 1969 protests year-round, this year celebrates World Pride 2019 in NYC. This annual event is slated to be the largest global Pride celebration.

It will mark the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Uprising and its pivotal role as the birthplace of the modern lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer civil rights movement.

READ ARTICLE

Our Initiative

Our initiative is to diversify our national parks by using a three layered approach:

Awareness - get people to stop and realize there is a problem here
Education - give them exposure to first hand experiences 
Action - take action by donating, volunteering, or spreading awareness

We're focused on connecting to more diverse audiences and creating content with this audience in mind.

Join Our Facebook Group below to join the discussion, share information, and connect with like-minded individuals. 

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Organizations advancing diversity outdoors

As an outdoor enthusiast, you may be wondering what you can to do support diversity, equity, and inclusion in the outdoors. The recent prominence of the Black Lives Matter Movement has brought issues of inequality and racism in the outdoors to the forefront and has made us question what we can do to be better allies and help drive change.

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